Nozzle selctor mod - It's me asking a tech question again!

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forestfighter7
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Post by forestfighter7 » Tue Nov 21, 2006 6:35 pm

Hello all,
I'm doing a nozzle selector mod on my 12.11k and I have a few questions. First of all, do you just cut the plastic until the first screen is visible and then attach an adaptor? If so how does this increase stream lamination? Wouldn't it gather excess water behind the new nozzles?




Edited By forestfighter7 on 1164152205
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SilentGuy
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Post by SilentGuy » Tue Nov 21, 2006 6:50 pm

http://www.sscentral.org/tech/mods/ans.php

Lamination isn't necessarily increased. I haven't done the mod but my nozzles haven't even come close to the lamination of commercial soakers. However, by having custom sizes, you can find the ideal aperture size and maximize the range, and you can also pick from a variety.

Yes, you do cut to the first screen. It won't gather excess water--not any more than normal. You use epoxy or something to hold on a PVC male adapter, or tubing that runs to a male adapter.

forestfighter7
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Post by forestfighter7 » Tue Nov 21, 2006 6:56 pm

So it's the size that increases range. Thanks for clearing that up for me. :)
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SilentGuy
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Post by SilentGuy » Tue Nov 21, 2006 8:10 pm

Well, lamination actually does have some influence. Larger streams have less surface area for a given amount of water and they'll probably have "groups" of water closer together. This way, there's less drag--like with less lamination.

Read this for a bit more on the subject.

SSCBen
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Post by SSCBen » Wed Nov 22, 2006 2:08 pm

SilentGuy hit the nail on the head. However, it would be a mistake to say that larger diameters always create more range as you stated forestfighter7. Several factors combine to make a certain orifice diameter better than others. Among these factors are stream velocity and stream diameter. A smaller stream has more velocity, which is good for range. The stream breaks up more easily with more velocity however due to the high speeds combined with the small diameter. A larger stream diameter is more resistant to breaking up, but travels slower. So a moderately sized stream is right for best range because it combines the best of everything.

How you determine the right sized stream is fairly simple: you have to test it manually. You can get a little closer if you do some math, but I've found that manual testing, while it might be boring, is what works. The nozzle selector modification allows you to test different nozzle orifice diameters.

SilentGuy
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Post by SilentGuy » Wed Nov 22, 2006 7:13 pm

If you plot the range vs. the nozzle area, you should get a bell curve. But it's hard to model, at least for multiple soakers, because of factors like the pressure.

Ben summarized the thread I linked to--smaller streams can move faster for more distance, but with high-powered guns, a larger stream can keep that velocity (it won't slow down so quickly) and go farther. The thread points out that the CPS 2000 is weak on flat shots due to a large nozzle and slow velocity--but that velocity is fairly constant so it lobs water far and slow when you aim it at an angle.

Another point worth mentioning is that homemade nozzle selectors really aren't meant for you to switch between nozzles. They literally allow you to select the best nozzle, but not much more. Because you have to screw the endcaps on and off each time you switch, switching in battle is ineffective. (And conserving water? Yeah, right; either conserve from the start or use a backpack.) But for pure testing purposes, having two or three endcaps and a drill is ideal.

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